Friday, 15 December 2017

BUSINESS AND ECONOMY

Two protesters were shot dead Friday as opposition supporters clashed with police in western Kenya, with hundreds defying a ban on rallies to express their anger over an increasingly uncertain presidential election.

In the town of Bondo, the rural home of opposition leader Raila Odinga, a large crowd confronted officers outside the police station, scattering as live shots were fired.

Witnesses told AFP two people were shot dead. “One person had his head shattered by a bullet while the other was hit on the chest,” said eyewitness Sam Oguma.

Police commander Leonard Katana said the demonstrators were shot after attempting to “attack” the police station.

Regional security official Wilson Njega confirmed the two deaths, saying a full report would be issued once the circumstances of the killings became clear.

In the main western city Kisumu, 50 kilometres (30 miles) from Bondo, 20 people were admitted to hospital with serious injuries, four of them with gunshot wounds including one man in a critical condition who had been shot in the neck, said hospital chief Juliana Otieno.

Several nursery school children were also hospitalised after police fired tear gas into the Mt Carmel Academy in the Nyalenda slum.

“There was tear gas all over the school and more kept being fired by the police,” said Mary Ochieng, a witness.

The protests come as Kenya is mired in confusion over a presidential election that is due to take place in less than two weeks.

Friday’s violence was the worst since clashes in the days after the August election which left 37 dead.

A local human rights group said 35 of them were shot dead by police.

A new election?
In early September, the country’s Supreme Court annulled the results of an August 8 election — won by President Uhuru Kenyatta — citing irregularities in the counting process and mismanagement by the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC).

And it ordered that a re-run of the vote be held within 60 days, with the date set for October 26.

But Odinga on Tuesday announced he would not take part, accusing the IEBC of failing to make fundamental reforms.

Odinga has argued that his withdrawal from the race should force the IEBC to cancel the election and begin the whole process from scratch — allowing more time for his reforms.

But the IEBC appears to be pushing forward with plans for the vote, saying only that Odinga had yet to submit the required form to officially pull out of the race.

Kenyatta on Friday signed a supplementary budget allocating 12 billion shillings ($116 million, 98 million euros) for the new election.

Chaos in Kisumu
The government ban on protests has further angered the opposition National Super Alliance (NASA) coalition.

Security Minister Fred Matiangi on Thursday banned rallies in the centre of Nairobi, Mombasa and the western city of Kisumu after property was destroyed, passers-by robbed or assaulted, and business disrupted.

However, the opposition pushed ahead with protests Friday, and plans to stage daily rallies next week.

In Kisumu, the main city in the west and Odinga’s stronghold, there were chaotic scenes as police fired teargas and gunshots rang out as protesters pelted them with stones.

Published in Headliners

Kenyan opposition leader Raila Odinga withdrew Tuesday from a re-run of the presidential election, saying electoral officials had failed to make necessary reforms.

“After deliberating on our position in respect of the upcoming election… we believe that all will be best served by (the party) vacating its presidential candidature in the election scheduled for 26 October 2017,” Odinga said.

Kenya’s Supreme Court last month annulled the August presidential poll, won by President Uhuru Kenyatta, due to widespread irregularities in the counting process.

Since then Odinga and his National Super Alliance (NASA) have vowed not to take part in the re-run unless a series of reforms were made to the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC).

“We have come to the conclusion that there is no intention on the part of the IEBC to undertake any changes to its operations and personnel… All indications are that the election scheduled for 26 October will be worse than the previous one,” said Odinga.

Published in Headliners
Sunday, 13 August 2017 22:05

Kenya opposition urges strike over vote

Kenya's opposition leader has urged people to stay away from work on Monday over the disputed election result.

Raila Odinga said it would be a "day of mourning for the fallen patriots" after a rally in Kibera, the largest slum in the capital Nairobi.

The international community has urged calm following the election, which Mr Odinga alleges was fixed.

But after Mr Odinga spoke on Sunday, renewed violence broke out between his supporters and their opponents.

Police fired tear gas in Mathare - a slum where Mr Odinga met the family of a nine-year-old girl shot by a stray bullet.

AFP is reporting at least 16 people were killed between Friday evening and Saturday night. The Kenya National Commission on Human Rights said on Saturday 24 people had been shot dead during protests since election day on 8 August.

It is unclear how much these two figures overlap.

Tear gas was fired at opposition leader Raila Odinga's supporters

In a tweet sent after the rally, Mr Odinga said they had died at the hands of "Jubilee mandated death squads", referring to Mr Kenyata's party.

A man was also killed in Kisumu county, an opposition stronghold and the centre of post-election ethnic violence in 2007, when 1,200 people died and 600,000 were displaced.

"This is a failed regime that is resorting to killing people instead of addressing the real issue. The vote was stolen. There's no secret about that," Mr Odinga told the 4,000 people who had gathered to hear him talk on Sunday.

The official results gave President Uhuru Kenyatta 54.3%, and Mr Odinga 44.7%.

He added: "We had predicted they will steal the election and that's what happened. We are not done yet. We will not give up. Wait for the next course of action which I will announce the day after tomorrow.

"But for now I want to tell you not to go to work tomorrow Monday)."

Kenyan opposition leader Raila Odinga addresses thousands of his supportersImage copyrightEPA
Mr Odinga has promised a response to the election results on Tuesday

The BBC's reporter in Nairobi said his claims were contrary to reports from both local and international observers that the poll was free and fair.

European Union foreign affairs chief Federica Mogherini and former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan are among those who have urged Mr Odinga to seek redress through the courts - something the opposition coalition says is not an option.

The Elections Observation Group (Elog), which had 8,300 observers, said its projected outcome put Mr Kenyatta on 54%, just short of the official figure of 54.3%.

Published in Headliners

Kenya's opposition has accused the government of "state terror" and vowed to overturn a "sham" result.

Senior opposition official James Orengo said they would not go to court to achieve this. He urged people to stay calm and out of harm's way.

Mr Orengo alleged that about 100 people had been killed by the Kenyan security forces but did not offer evidence.

Official results gave President Uhuru Kenyatta 54.3%. His challenger Raila Odinga called the election a "charade".

"They knew they were going to steal an election. They knew the people would be unhappy. Therefore all the instruments of violence were put in place," Mr Orengo said.

The Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR) meanwhile said 24 people had been shot dead by police during protests.


Hope for return to normality - BBC's Alastair Leithead in Nairobi

Protester in KiberaImage copyrightEPA

What Kenya needs right now is strong leadership. From the government side, that means ensuring security forces don't use excessive force while containing protest.

The opposition National Super Alliance needs to send a clear message to their supporters not to use violence. But in a media conference, lacking the most senior alliance leaders, they said only that people should "stay out of harms way".

They seem lacking in direction and united only by the statement: "We will not be cowed. We will not relent".

They still do not accept the results of the election, but have not yet provided strong evidence for why they believe the elections was rigged, or for the large number of people they claim have been killed.

The clashes are intense but isolated. There is nothing like the level of anger or violence that sparked the killings ten years ago and many Kenyans hope they can return to normal life as soon as possible.


The victims included a nine-year-old girl hit by a stray bullet in a Nairobi's Mathere slum.

A man was also killed in Kisumu county, an opposition stronghold and the centre of post-election ethnic violence in 2007, when 1,200 people died and 600,000 were displaced.

 
The BBC's Emmanuel Igunza says there is an "uneasy calm" in Kisumu

Earlier the Elections Observation Group (Elog), which had 8,300 observers, said its projected outcome put Mr Kenyatta on 54%, just short of the official figure of 54.3%

But Mr Orengo questioned Elog's independence.

Kenya's acting interior minister Fred Matiang'i has urged people to return to their normal lives and called for Kenyans to use social media responsibly.

Mr Matiang'i said most areas were calm but there had been some violence which he blamed on criminals.

Odinga supporters in mathareImage copyrightEPA
Image captionOpposition supporters have been confronting police in Nairobi's Mathare slum
Woman shelters behind police during clashes in Kibera slumImage copyrightREUTERS
Violence also broke out in Kibera slum

Mr Kenyatta has urged peace. "We have seen the results of political violence. And I am certain that there is no single Kenyan who would wish for us to go back to this," he said.

Ahead of the results, Mr Odinga had called on his supporters to remain calm, but added that he did not control anyone, and that "people want to see justice".

Rights group Amnesty International has called for the Kenyan authorities to investigate the killings.


Kenyan media reacts - BBC Monitoring

Kenya newspapersImage copyrightEPA

All major newspapers in Kenya agreed that the president's first duty should be to heal the divisions that were exposed during the election.

The Star newspaper said the extent of Mr Kenyatta's victory "was surprising, even shocking, but we should accept it and move on. Kenya deserves peace and development".

On local radio, pro-ruling party stations hosted jubilant callers. On Radio Nam Lolwe, which broadcasts to opposition areas, a caller spoke of "heartbreaking" scenes where protests had turned violent, saying: "Let us desist from violence and preach peace".

Ramogi FM radio, which broadcasts in the Luo language of defeated candidate Raila Odinga, played gospel music - a break from the usual Saturday discussion programmes.

Published in Business and Economy

The Kenya election commission on Friday declared incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta had won a second and final five-year term in this week’s polls, despite opposition objections over the fairness of the vote.

Kenyatta took 54.27 percent of the vote, and opposition leader Raila Odinga took 44.74 percent, said election commission head Wafula Chebukati.

President Uhuru Kenyatta has won re-election in Kenya, defeating veteran opposition leader and longtime rival Raila Odinga in a tense contest.

Kenya’s election commission declared Friday that the 55-year-old businessman and son of the country’s founding President had received enough votes to secure a second five-year term.
Provisional and unverified reporting following Tuesday’s vote had given Kenyatta a wide margin of 54% to 45% with 98% of polling stations reporting.
He garnered 54.27% of the final vote; Odinga received 44.74%.
The nation’s top elections official, Wafula Chebukati, said the vote was carried out in a “free, fair and credible manner.”
Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta high-fives with supporters after casting his vote in Tuesday's presidential election.
Odinga, a 72-year-old former political prisoner who has campaigned for the presidency four times, is refusing to accept the results, claiming the vote was hacked.
Speaking before the declaration, Musalia Mudavadi, co-principal of the opposition’s National Super Alliance (NASA), said they would not be party to the announcement of Kenyatta as president, citing unresolved concerns about the veracity of the electoral process.
“The issues we raised have not been adequately addressed,” he said. “One can conclude that they (Kenya’s Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission) were not keen on taking our concerns seriously.”
James Orengo, NASA party chief agent, described the process as a “disaster.” “This has been an entire charade. The judgment is now out there in the court of public opinion.”
 
Odinga, running as the NASA candidate, told CNN Thursday that he doesn’t “trust” the paper forms from polling stations around the country that officials used to authenticate votes.
Odinga said the forms could have been “manipulated” before being returned to the capital. At a news conference Thursday, members of Odinga’s party gave no evidence to support any claims of election tampering, citing only unnamed sources at the election commission.
Kisumu's main street "Oginga Odinga street," named for Raila's father who acted as the country's first vice president, was largely deserted on Friday.
In a letter released Friday morning, Chebukati, the chairman of the election commission, rejected the opposition coalition’s evidence of election fraud, calling it “obviously and plainly falsified.”
On Thursday, Chebukati said tampering with the election system “was attempted but did not succeed,” without elaborating further.

Fears of violence

Peaceful elections in East Africa’s largest economy would help provide stability to the region but allegations of vote rigging have sparked concern with some Kenyans fearing ethnic clashes similar to those triggered a decade ago.
More than 1,000 died in months of violence and bloodshed after Odinga — who had been defeated by the then-President Mwai Kibaki — claimed the 2007 election had been rigged.
Odinga and his party repeatedly called for calm this week as the final results were compiled.
Kenyan security personnel walk towards burning barricades on a road in Kisumu on Wednesday.
Extra security forces have been deployed to the streets of Kenya’s capital, Nairobi, interior ministry spokesman Mwenda Njoka told CNN. Additional police have also been installed at the airport in the western city of Kisumu as a preventative measure, according to Reuters.
Nairobi remained quieter than usual after the national holiday on Tuesday. Some businesses were open in the city center but mostly people were remaining indoors; other residents who went to their home villages to vote might also have stayed away.
In Kisumu, a local journalist described the city center as “a ghost town.”
At least two people died in election-related violence after brief protests broke out in several Odinga strongholds — in Nairobi and Kisumu — on Wednesday. The day before, a polling agent from Odinga’s party was killed in a machete attack in Tana River county.
Odinga's hacking claims this week have ratched up tensions in his strongholds.
“We do not want to see any violence in Kenya. We know the consequences of what happened in 2008 and we don’t want to see a repeat of that anymore,” Odinga told CNN on Thursday.
“I don’t control anybody. What is happening is that people just want to see justice. We also hope that the security forces are not going to use excessive force.”
Published in Headliners
Wednesday, 09 August 2017 00:46

Kenyans vote in tight, tense elections

Kenyans began voting Tuesday in general elections headlined by a too-close-to-call battle between incumbent Uhuru Kenyatta and his rival Raila Odinga that has sent tensions soaring in east Africa’s richest economy.

From first-time voters to those bent with age, thousands descended upon polling stations, some from before midnight, to cast their ballots under heavy security.

Voting began relatively smoothly, with minor delays and technical hiccups, while all eyes are on a biometric voter identification and tallying system whose success is seen as crucial to a smooth election.

“I voted Raila, because he will be so much better to us. But if he does not win, it’s ok. It’s a democracy after all. Really, there’s no need for violence,” said Tom Mboya, 43, who works in construction and voted in the capital’s largest slum Kibera.

Tensions soared in the last days of the campaign with the murder of a top election official in charge of the electronic voting system and opposition claims of a plot to rig the vote heightening a feverish atmosphere of conspiracy and suspicion.

The polls come a decade after a shambolic election — which foreign observers agreed was riddled with irregularities — sparked violence which left more than 1,100 dead and 600,000 displaced.

Odinga, 72, who is the flagbearer for the NASA coalition, is taking his fourth and likely final stab at the presidency.

He claims elections in 2007 and 2013 were stolen from him and right up until the eve of the vote, insisted that Kenyatta’s Jubilee Party planned to rig Tuesday’s presidential election.

Elections in 2013 were marred by the widespread failure of the electronic system, forcing officials to revert to manual counting of the vote. However Odinga took his grievances to the courts instead of the streets, where he lost.

Dynastic rivalry
The devolution of power to Kenya’s 47 counties after a post-conflict constitutional reform means elections are now a complex affair, with citizens casting six different ballots.

Several tight races for posts such as governor have seen tensions flaring at the local level.

Nevertheless all eyes are on what is set to be the last showdown of a dynastic rivalry that has lasted more than half a century since the presidential candidates’ fathers Jomo Kenyatta and Jaramogi Odinga went from allies in the struggle for independence to bitter rivals.

The men belong to two of the country’s main ethnic groups, Kenyatta from the Kikuyu, the largest, and Odinga from the Luo.

Both have secured formidable alliances with other influential communities in a country where voting takes place largely along tribal lines.

Kenyatta, 55, is seeking re-election after a first term in which he oversaw a massive infrastructure drive and steady economic growth of more than five percent.

“He has done a lot for the country and he must absolutely be re-elected. He has built a lot of infrastructure, like the SGR train (between Nairobi and Mombasa), he has created jobs,” said Evelyn Sum, 32, dressed in an elegant brown coat.

However Kenyatta is also criticised for soaring food prices — with prices jumping 20 percent year-on-year in May — and massive corruption scandals on his watch.

“Life is more and more expensive, especially the flour and the sugar. That’s not good for poor people like us, and we hope that Odinga will change this,” said Rose Lida, 48, wrapped in a red Maasai blanket on the chilly morning.

Obama urges peace
Former US president Barack Obama, whose father was born in Kenya, led a chorus of international calls on the eve of the vote for a peaceful election.

“I urge Kenyan leaders to reject violence and incitement; respect the will of the people,” Obama said in a statement.

There are more than 19 million registered voters in the nation of 48 million. Half are aged under 35.

More than 150,000 security forces — including wildlife, prison and forestry officers — have been deployed for the vote, which ends at 5pm (1400 GMT).

Counting will begin immediately and the polls commission has a week to release final results.

Published in Headliners
 

A gunman and a police officer were killed in an attack on the home of Kenya’s deputy president in the western town of Eldoret, a senior administrator said Sunday, just more than a week before a national election.

Deputy President William Ruto and his family were not at home at the time of the Saturday attack, police said. Ruto is the running mate of President Uhuru Kenyatta, who is seeking a second and final term in office in the Aug. 8 elections.

“From the exchange of fire we thought it was more than one attacker, because he used different firearms, but after we subdued him, we found only one man dead, plus our officer who he had killed,” Wanyama Musiambo, Rift Valley Regional Coordinator, told reporters at the scene Sunday.

FILE- The home of Kenya's Deputy President William Ruto in Sugoi village near Eldoret, Kenya, Aug. 4, 2010.
FILE- The home of Kenya's Deputy President William Ruto in Sugoi village near Eldoret, Kenya, Aug. 4, 2010.

Musiambo declined to comment when asked about the motive of the attack, or the attacker’s identity. The deputy president’s residence is guarded by an elite paramilitary police unit.

Musiambo said the attacker initially had no gun but managed to break into the police armory once inside the compound.

“I want to say that after the operation we discovered that it was one gunman, but because he was inside there, he could change position and firearms because he had access to the guns. And the guns he was using were ours,” he said. “We have however launched investigations into the issue, to find out if he conducted the attack alone or he was with others who may have escaped.”

Late Saturday, police initially said the attacker was armed with a machete and had injured one police officer before holing himself up in an outbuilding.

Ruto and Kenyatta spent Saturday campaigning in the counties of Kitale, Kericho and Narok, the president’s office said in a statement. Neither commented on the incident.

A Reuters reporter near Ruto’s compound said he saw several police vehicles going in and out of the compound, as well as one armored vehicle in the compound.
The reporter said he also saw one armored vehicle in the compound.

Published in Business and Economy

With a picture-perfect coastline, unrivalled wildlife and a fascinating culture, there are countless reasons you should go to Kenya – but here are just a few…

You can take an alternative safari

Before I ever actually went on a safari, I thought the popular activity was all about sitting in a 4×4 behind reinforced windows and gazing at animals from afar.

How wrong I was. It turns out it’s perfectly safe to get up close and personal with the animals – not to the extent of petting a lion or trying to tickle an elephant’s tummy (obviously), but to feel a lot closer than the traditional 4x4s would have you believe.

At Ol Malo Lodge in Laikipia County, a beautiful, boutique hotel with just a handful of bedrooms, there’s no need for 4x4s.

While you can, of course, go wildlife-spotting in a truck, it seems far more adventurous to venture out on foot, with a guided walk with a local Samburu tribesman, or to sit atop a camel or horse while trying to spot animals between the trees.

It’s a surreal experience to be gazing at zebras, elephants, giraffes and more, just feet away, while clinging onto your camel for dear life with one hand and snapping away with your camera with the other.

You can learn all about another culture

9 reasons you need to book a trip to Kenya right now
A young Samburu shepherdess (Picture: Getty)

Ol Malo works very closely with the local Samburu tribe, so, as a visitor, you’re offered a firsthand perspective into their fascinating lives.

Just hours after stepping off the tiny Safarilink plane that whisked us from Nairobi to Laikipia, we were strolling through the wilderness on our way to a local Samburu village, accompanied by our guide Leuia.

The Samburu are a polygamous, nomadic tribe that live in villages called manyattas. In this particular part of Laikipia, they work closely with Ol Malo, giving guests access to their vastly different, intriguing lives.

They have a variety of interesting customs – drinking blood as a major food source, enduring painful rituals to become warriors (such as men getting circumcised without even being allowed to wince – ouch!) and creating treasured jewellery formed of beads, with each different shape and colour symbolising a different meaning.

You can see genuine corporate social responsibility in action 

Ol Malo set up the Samburu Trust, an organisation that works closely with the Samburu people, providing everything from clean water and healthcare to beadmaking workshops and a nomadic school.

So many hotels work closely with the local community, but it feels more hands-on here.

Guests are invited to watch the beadmaking workshops that help the Samburu women bring an income to their homes, and we were also given a tour of the nomadic school where children from the local tribe can get a primary education.

You can watch your breakfast being hoovered up by an eland

True story: if you’re not too protective over your cornflakes, then you’ll probably enjoy watching Ol Malo’s resident eland demolishing your cereal.

You can hang out with adorable animals

If you’ve always secretly wished The Lion King was real-life, and not just a film, I’ve got good news for you – you can find a live-action version in Kenya.

The beautiful Fairmont Mount Kenya Safari Club, a sophisticated, elegant hotel in Nanyuki with gorgeous views of Mount Kenya, not only has monkeys running around the property, but is also home to an animal orphanage, where you can spot everything from leopards and warthogs (yes, real life Pumbas!) to zebras, sunis (tiny, adorable antelopes) and even a 150-year-old tortoise whose life expectancy is 300.

I defy you to take a trip Ol Pejeta Conservancy (a short drive from the Fairmont Mount Kenya Safari Club), and not want to drop your job, cramped flat and everything you know to go and live with baby animals.

This baby zebra – which we named Storm – was abandoned by his mother after a bout of awful weather, and is now being cared for by experts at the conservancy.

While of course he was fluffy and adorable, meeting the scared, week-old creature shaking and searching for his mother was also a heartbreaking experience, and the importance of funding and donating to conservancies like these really hit home.

You can stay on opposite sides of the equator

The Fairmont Mount Kenya Safari Club has the enviable position of being split down the middle by the equator.

There are two basins on opposite sides of the path that’s directly on the equator, and on each side, the water in the basin swirls down the plughole in opposite directions.

If you want to splash out on a truly equatorial adventure, the Equatorial Suite – where Winston Churchill used to stay – has a bed with one side in the southern hemisphere, and the other in the northern.

You can learn about the increasingly important issue of conservation

Ol Pejeta is home to the last three northern white rhinos in the world.

The last male, Sudan, is the equivalent of 100 years old, and we were able to meet him at the conservancy.

The last two female northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu, also live at the conservancy, but are sadly infertile.

It will take a miracle of science, such as stem cell technology, to keep the species alive so that it doesn’t die with the last three at the conservancy.

You can do some crazy things too

If petting rhinos and trying to spot stingrays isn’t crazy enough for you, take a trip to the postcard-pretty Diani Beach, with its endless white sand beaches and Instagram-friendly panoramas.

If lazing at the pool or building sandcastles isn’t quite daring enough, there’s always Skydive Diani.

You may never have experienced terror like it (signing the waiver is scarier than actually jumping out of the plane), but after the rush of hurtling through the Kenyan sky, there’s no view quite like the one you see while suspended in the air with the calm sea and stretches of Diani Beach below you.

When the adrenaline rush is over, you can crash at the enormous pool at Diani Beach’s beautiful Swahili Beach, and rewatch for the hundredth time the video of the exact moment you jumped out of the plane.

You can eat some fantastic food

Kenya is a heaven for foodies, with plenty of amazing culinary spots.

Picca Alapatt, the chef at Fairmont Mount Kenya Safari Club whips up an incredible Indian feast, with huge platters of dishes catering to the most avid meat-eaters as well as vegetarians too.

Eating a five-course breakfast on the slopes of Mount Kenya, and gorging on a seemingly endless feast by a bonfire in the large grounds of the resort are particular highlights offered by the hotel that you shouldn’t miss out on.

The Sands at Nomad Hotel – a boutique property in Diani Beach – is also a culinary delight worth experiencing, with its classy beach setting, fresh, tasty food and perfect views of the white sands and glittering seas.

The Carnivore, in Nairobi, brands itself a “beast of a feast”, and for good reason. If you’re vegan or vegetarian it may not be the ideal place for you (there’s a lot of meat being passed around), but for carnivores, you’ll get to try everything: ostrich meatball, lamb chops, turkey, crocodile and even bull testicle. Yum.

How do I get there?

Kenya Airways flies to Nairobi from Heathrow daily, with economy class tickets starting from £439, and business class tickets starting from £1891 return.

Considering that the chairs in business recline to an almost fully flat bed and that you’re presented with the snuggliest blanket on the planet to fall asleep under, upgrading to business is definitely worth considering – it certainly seems like better value for money than many other business class long-haul flights out there.

Where do I stay? 

In Laikipia, Ol Malo Lodge is offering a ‘Stay 3, Pay 2’ special offer for 2017, with prices starting from $530 per night, including guided walks, horseriding, camel treks, Samburu cultural visits and more.

The posh Fairmont Mount Kenya Safari Club – a favourite haunt of Winston Churchill and Bing Crosby – offers rooms from $265 per person per night on a full board basis. 

Swahili Beach, a luxury hotel with enormous rooms, a swimming pool fit for a king and an ideal location right next to the beach, offers rates starting from £160 per night per room on a half-board basis. 

Before catching your flight back home, you’ll want to spend some time in Nairobi too, and you can’t pick a better place to rest your head for the night than the elegant Fairmont The NorfolkA bed and breakfast stay starts from $200 per person per night.

For more information on visiting Kenya, you can contact the Kenya Tourism Board on 020 7593 1731 or visit Magical Kenya. 



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